Feeds

Spammers target hamsters after Ig Nobel winning research

Gay bombs, viagra, and indexing 'the'

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Today is surely the biggest day of the year for boffins and those involved in the pursuit of boffinry. Because today, the Ig Nobel awards are handed out. Well, they were handed out last night, but the boffins will be having their hangovers today, and that is even more important.

As regular readers will know, the Ig Nobel Awards are given to scientists who have contributed a certain something to the overall store of human knowledge, and have simultaneously made us all wonder, "what were they thinking?" The tagline of the awards is "research that makes people laugh, then think".

This year's illustrious winners include the team of geniuses who came up with the idea of a "gay bomb". Although it was not ever constructed, the idea behind this was that when unleashed behind enemy lines, the chemical bomb would render enemy soldiers more interested in pursuing one another, than in fighting an actual war.

The prize for physics went to a team who tackled the tricky and vexing question of just how it is that sheets become wrinkled. A team that demonstrated that ducks can't tell the difference between the Japanese and German languages, if they are played backwards, won the prize for linguistics.

Glenda Brown of Australia took home a trophy for her unstinting search for the best way to index titles that start with "The". She said the band "The The" cause particular difficulties. Thankless work, we are sure, so good to see it being recognised.

Medical work is recognised, too. So let's hear it for the researcher who discovered that the injury most often sustained by professional sword swallowers is a sore throat.

But our favourite has to be the work done in Argentina, which determined that viagra can help hamsters recover from jetlag. Splendid news indeed, since hamsters are known for their globe trotting.

We are a little confused tough, as to how you would spot a jetlagged hamster. From our own childhoods we seem to remember the damn things spent virtually 24 hours a day sleeping, or hiding in a plastic boot. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less
'Some might find this idea offensive' boffin admits
No sail: NASA spikes Sunjammer
'Solar sail' demonstrator project binned
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.