Feeds

Toshiba pledges 30in OLED TV will ship in 2009

Rather bigger than Sony's latest

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Toshiba has cocked a snook at the 11in OLED TV Sony announced this week and pledged to bring a 30in model to market effectively within the next two years.

A company spokeswoman yesterday told IDG that the screen would go on sale in 2009.

Sony unveiled its XEL-1 OLED TV in Japan - an ultraslim screen that contains a display panel that's just 3mm thick. That, along with a massive contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1, are the big advantages to OLED (organic light emitting diode) technology.

It's all about the backlight - or, rather, the lack of it. Because the diodes themselves emit light, no backlight is needed. That allows the panels to be made much thinner than LCDs and plasma TVs, and since there's no light illuminating even black pixels, the image is brighter and displays a higher contrast. Power consumption is reduced too, partly because there's not always-on backlight, but also because unilluminated diodes consume no power.

The downside: OLED panels don't last as long as LCDs and they're harder to make, which is why Sony's starting out with a small, 11in screen. OLED lifespans are currently rated at around just under three-and-a-half years' continuous usage, compared to under six for LCD technology. That's continuous use, not the much more occasional usage of the real world.

Toshiba is also developing, with Canon, TVs based on SED (Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Display) technology, said to produce a picture a bright as an CRT TV's but in a flat-panel casing. However, both companies have had a tough time getting the system out of the door.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Disturbance in the force lets phones detect gestures with Wi-Fi
These are the movement detection devices you're looking for
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?