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Levanta freshens up Linux server cure-all

Like soap for your penguins

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Linux specialist Levanta has issued a fresh release of its flagship software that brings a host of new high-end management tools.

Before we dig in to the new features in Levanta 6.0, let's travel over to the company's press release for the product. "Levanta today announced a family of no–compromise data center automation solutions for growing Linux environments. With the release of Levanta 6.0, Levanta adds end–to–end automation capabilities to its existing best–of–breed line of Intrepid Linux lifecycle management solutions." That's a no-compromise, end-to-end, best-of-breed solution for lifecycle management, in case you missed it. Classic stuff.

According to the Levanta folks we spoke with, the major additions separating Version 5.1, released in May, from Version 6.0 come in the form of application and system monitors. Customers will now find some monitoring agents that look over your Linux server farm to discover things such as disk usage, system utilization and overall server count. The software then does similar things for application usage by examining what processes are running and how demanding they are.

To deal with any issues that arise from, say, system overload, Levanta has added in a number of automated, policy engine-type tools that will re-configure hardware and applications on-the-fly as needed.

Those of you not paying attention will remember Levanta as LinuxCare. The company switched names a couple of years back, deciding to focus on crafting server management appliances for Linux-heavy data centers rather than just providing technical support. Now, you're left with a company that sounds a lot like a bar of soap or perhaps Pfizer's latest pill.

Levanta sells three appliances, ranging from the high-end Intrepid X to the lower-end Intrepid S. In the middle is the Intrepid M. We're told that the X systems are geared for iSCSI and Fibre Channel systems, while the new M system requires NetApp filers on the back-end. Meanwhile, the S unit is a standalone, 2U appliance.

You'll find the gear here.

Pricing for the standalone system starts at $19,900 with a license to manage 20 servers. ®

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