Feeds

BEA balances VMware with Xen

Less is more

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Having snuggled up to VMware, the proprietary and expensive virtualization platform, BEA Systems is going to the other extreme by officially backing Xen.

The middleware vendor is working to certify its recently launched WebLogic Server Virtual Edition against the free, open source Xen hypervisor by the end of this year.

Guy Churchward, BEA vice president of engineering, told The Register WebLogic Server Virtual Edition is already running on Xen in BEA's labs, and it's just a question of certification and whether Xen can become "enterprise grade" in time.

"I'd look to certification and support against Xen by the end of the year, subject to the fact we feel comfortable with this stuff," Churchward said during a recent interview.

Certification would expand WebLogic Server Virtual Edition's platform reach, "because a lot of companies are developing and working against certification in Xen."

Those new platforms could include appliances, which have a small footprint. BEA's overall strategy for WebLogic is to make the application server modular using BEA's microServices Architecture (mSA) that will break out different elements.

The goal is for developers and users to download and install only the modules they want, such as the core application server but not the management console, to help reduce download and start-up times in system with limited resources. That's the two-year roadmap, anyway.

There's a belief at BEA that support for Xen could help lower the price of the virtual-server-based edition of its application server. Launched in July and optimized for VMware's ESX, Server WebLogic Server Virtual Edition kicks in at a typically (for BEA) meaty $13,000 per instance.

BEA hopes to adopt what it called a "utility model" with pricing based on usage rather than instance, but that could take some years to develop as a technology and a concept BEA is willing to embrace given it built a fat business charging per CPU.

Ahead of that, there is Xen, which Churchward believes has the potential power to turn virtualization into a commodity and bring WebLogic Server Virtual Edition to a broad market. "It [Xen] will change the economics for the customer... if it lives up to expectations.

"It'll create a dynamic with VMware," he added. "My personal opinion is [over time] you'll see the hypervisor coming into the chips."®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?