Feeds

Dutch pull the plug on e-voting

Back to red pens - for now

Reducing security risks from open source software

A Dutch judge has declared the use of Nedap e-voting machines in recent Dutch elections unlawful.

The 9,000 Nedap-made machines used in the November and March elections were not adequately authorised and at least one type of Nedap machine wasn't even certified. Despite the ruling, the election results will remain valid.

The ruling is yet another victory for the Dutch "we don't trust voting computers foundation", which in the past demonstrated that many Dutch e-voting machines could be easily intercepted from 20 to 30 metres away.

The Dutch government decided last week to pull to plug on the e-voting venture, citing the lack of a paper trail as its biggest shortcoming. Until an automated paper counting solution can be deployed, the Dutch will have to revert back to the red pencil. Citizens of the Dutch town of Utrecht will elect a new Mayor next week in the traditional manner.

Nedap says the decision won't affect its business. As the sole supplier of e-voting machines in the Netherlands it is likely to introduce more solid machines in the near future. At least one Dutch analyst called the situation "a blessing in disguise" for Nedap. Nedap stresses that reverting back to pen and paper isn't the solution.

Voters in Hamburg are to use a digital pen when casting their votes in the state parliament election next February. With the digital pen, which contains a small camera, voters can still use paper ballots and mark them with crosses as before. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.