Feeds

Green Dell gets greener with new green initiative

So green they crap leprechauns

High performance access to file storage

A lot of PC makers are riding the going green pony pretty hard these days, but the folks at Dell — you've got to give them credit — are making a show out of boiling the poor thing down to eco-friendly glue.

Nary a week goes by without Dell reminding us how they intend to sponge off our ravaged Earth Mother. Don't get the wrong impression — nature is wicked rad and all that. And at least Dell has come a long ways from the days using prison labor to scrap their toxic waste. But give our inbox a break.

Today, Dell is claiming it will become the first computer manufacturer to make its operations "carbon neutral."

CEO Michael Dell heralded a series of programs to shrink the company's carbon footprint and offset its greenhouse gas emissions by 2008.

"Carbon neutral!" you might exclaim. "That sounds fantastically impressive."

Well hold your — er — horses a minute. That particular buzzword deserves a disclaimer.

For every unit of greenhouse gas that goes into computer production and distribution, Dell will find an equal offset through investing in renewable energy sources or energy efficiency. Of course, the carbon still going into the atmosphere isn't actually "neutralized" in any real sense. It's an eco-friendly step, but calling it "carbon neutral" is a little like saying 10 - 5 = 0. But we digress.

"I think it's the right thing to do," said Michael Dell. "These are important issues. When you think about our industry, we produce 260 million computers a year. There's a responsibility that comes with that."

Dell said the company will invest more in technology to reduce its energy consumption and participate in programs such as efforts to plant more trees. In fact, Dell is expanding its "Plant a Tree for Me" program for private consumers to "Plant a Forest for Me," for companies buying in bulk.

The company says its Texas operations already get 10 per cent of its energy from "green sources," but wants to increase that percentage. Their efforts will primarily involve emissions impacts created by electricity use and facility heating and cooling. Lighting fixtures will be replaced with energy efficient florescence, and carbon-spewing machinery will be tuned or replaced. Turning off equipment at night when it's not being used has already saved $1.8m in electricity bills in the past year, Dell said. The company also vows to offset the emissions impact of employee business travel.

Of course, much of Dell's supplies come from contract manufacturers who are not bound by the company's eco-friendly guidelines. Dell is trying to account for this by requiring major suppliers to identify and report their emissions impact. The company says it is the first step in a long-term strategy to minimize emissions from supply-chain operations.

But it considers the practice a last resort. "We would just as soon not do any offsetting," said Mark Newton, Dell environmental policy leader. "We would like to make things green to the point where offsetting is not needed." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style
Biometrics and kid-friendly mode in back-to-basics blockbuster
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.