Feeds

Rackable starts moving ICE

White trash part two

Remote control for virtualized desktops

IDF Rackable continues to wear its wife-beater with pride, shipping a second take on the white trash data center concept.

Back in March, the plucky server start-up introduced the world to – booming voice – Concentro. Like Sun Microsystems, Rackable packed all of the data center essentials into a shipping container to provide customers with a supercomputing-class system in a can. Now we have Concentro II – or the ICE (Integrated Concentro Environment) Cube, as Rackable likes to call it.

The new unit holds more hardware than the first, can be produced at a quicker clip (90 days) thanks to some manufacturing tweaks and ships in both 40 foot and a new 20 foot flavors. Rackable has been showing off the ICE Cube here at the Intel Developer Forum.

Spec hounds will take note of the 28 racks (1400U) of servers or 4.1PB of storage that can fit in an ICE Cube. You can mix and match too.

Rackable has used its half-depth servers to pack so many systems in the container and uses DC power to lower the overall energy draw. It also pulls individual fans out of the server cases, replacing them with a few mega-fans that cool the container as a whole.

Sun's very similar Blackbox container only holds 7 racks of servers and 1.5PB of storage. Rackable also claims an 80 per cent cooling reduction, as compared to a 20 per cent reduction over a comparable data center from Sun.

And, in fact, a number of people we've talked to seem to think Rackable is on the better track with its design, although both vendors deserve credit here for trying something new.

Rackable and Sun point to their white trash data centers as options for companies that have space or power constraints. You simply order up a data center and plant it in the parking lot near some power and water. In addition, the military and other organizations wanting a lot of remote computing power could turn to these containers.

Sun points to the Stanford Linear Accelerator as its first Blackbox customer. Rackable claims a customer too, but won't reveal its name. (We think it might have three letters and operate out of Washington or Langley.) Raytheon has stepped up as an ICE Cube reseller.

There's more information on the ICE Cube here. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.