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Freescale simplifies embedded 32-bit applications

CodeWarrior v7.0 offers better interface, faster code

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Semiconductor giant Freescale aims to make it easier to build embedded 32-bit applications with a new version of its CodeWarrior Development Studio toolkit announced this week. Version 7.0 of CodeWarrior features an upgraded user interface and a batch of built-in utilities to speed up development of applications for its ColdFire chip family.

The full release will not be available until the end of 2007 but the company is including a complimentary 'preview' release with three of it ColdFire chip evaluation kits until then. The preview release covers the MCF5221x, MCF5223x and MCF5445x chip sets.

Improvements to the toolkit include a simplified project set-up dialogue with quick access to past projects and examples and an optimised ANSI C/C++ compiler with associated libraries to meet the special demands of embedded applications such as reduced code size and high performance. And it includes flash programming support for on-chip flash and external memory devices.

CodeWarrior v7.0 also now comes with built in versions of the Processor Expert and Device Initialization tools developed by the Czech Republic based embedded systems specialist UNIS.

Freescale - formerly Motorola's semiconductor division - developed the 32-bit ColdFire chip for a wide range of embedded applications such as industrial control and medical instrumentation. Alongside the CodeWarrior release, Freescale also announced new versions of several microcontroller products in the ColdFire range this week with extended support for USB and Ethernet connectivity. Freescale also announced embedded Linux support for the MCF5445x microprocessor range.

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