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Supermicro debuts super quiet server blade

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IDF Supermicro is showing off a new ultra quiet and low energy server blade at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco this week.

Uncharacteristically lacking a "super" prefix in its name, the OfficeBlade is designed for offices, departmental computing and — we venture this category is a bit more narrow — personal supercomputing applications.

"The OfficeBlade that we are demonstrating at IDF operates at less than 50 dB!" said CEO Charles Liang in the release. "With 10 DP blades featuring quad-core Xeon processors, Gigabit Ethernet switch, chassis management module and high-efficiency (93%) power supplies, the whole blade system only consumes 1500 watts of power."

Supermicro is also giving a preview of its SuperServer and SuperWorkstation systems designed for upcoming Intel multicore chipsets.

The company will introduce over fifteen dual-processor and uni-processor server and workstation boards based on the next generation of Intel Xeon and Core 2 processors.

The new boards based on the Seaburg chipset feature PCI-Express 2.0, a 1.6 GHz system bus, and up to 128GB memory. Boards based on the San Clemente chipset will sport DDR2 memory. Supermicro is extending its line of UP servers with a new family based on the Bigby chipset with support for a 1333MHz system bus and 800MHz DDR2 memory. The Supermicro C2SBX based on the Bearlake-X chipset provides PCI-Express 2.0 in a UP workstation, along with support for DDR3 memory at 1333 MHz, two IEEE 1394 ports and two PCI-X slots. ®

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