Feeds

German web host to go carbon neutral

Trusty old diesel engine at hand if renewable energy cocks up

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Web hosting firm Strato has pulled on its hemp-woven strides and made an ambitious proclamation that it will be completely carbon-free by January 2008.

The German-based company's CEO Damien Schmidt told The Register that while people may be more aware of reducing their individual carbon footprint, it was also important for tech firms to "look behind the screen" and consider the sizable, carbon-munching emissions spat out by IT equipment.

He said Strato had been doing its bit for the green brigade for some time now, and reckoned the firm had already significantly reduced CO2 emissions at its two data centres with a 30 per cent energy saving per customer in the past 18 months.

But to meet the magical 100 per cent mark, Schmidt said Strato planned to go much further by plumbing the depths of a famous German river to supply a single energy source to the web host firm.

He said: "We can afford to switch totally over to renewable energy and we are contracted for the next two years for 100 per cent hydro current energy from the Rhine River."

Asked how Strato can guarantee the electricity source supplied by NaturEnergie was totally CO2-free, Schimdt explained that German auditing board TUV had independently certified its renewable energy credentials.

The firm, which claims to have the second biggest web hosting service in Europe, added that it had also teamed up with AMD and Sun to help find ways of reducing energy consumption through new technology.

But what happens if Strato's renewable energy power supply fails?

A spokesman at the web host said: "We of course have a modern seven-diesel engine running starting at the very instance that the power fails... We have more than enough power in an emergency with diesel engines. Of course that's not carbon dioxide-free, but this is for emergency."

However, he claimed that in the past 10 years Strato had only been hit by one power outage. Offering reassurance to the firm's customers, he added: "We have enough diesel in the tank, it's not a problem." ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.