Feeds

Brussels deploys Galileo rescue plan

Farmers won't miss €2.2bn, say officials

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The European Union (EU) central bureaucracy has today announced its plan to save Galileo, the troubled European sat nav project. Brussels officials believe that no additional taxpayer cash would be required on top of existing EU plans, saying that funds could be reassigned from other areas.

According to AP, Transport Commissioner Jacques Barrot told an EU Parliamentary committee that "Galileo is a strategic project for the EU. We don't want to depend on the GPS signal, as the United States can step in at any time for military reasons".

It's generally thought that an additional €2.4bn must be found for Galileo's construction, after it became clear earlier this year that private funding would not be forthcoming.

Barrot reportedly proposed that most of the money, €2.2bn, could be transferred from an unspent agriculture budget. The remaining €200m could be found from funds previously earmarked for research and EU administration.

The unspecified costs of maintaining and running the satellites would still - according to Barrot - be met by private industry, who would recoup their expenses by charging for added-value Galileo services.

It appears the commissioners may be shifting to an overtly military-strategic stance on Galileo. As originally proposed, Galileo was to be entirely civil and safety-architecture in nature, and as such would not be designed for intentional removal/degradation of service. This was seen as a big selling point over the civil signal of the existing US military GPS, which may be degraded or removed in a given area at the discretion of the Americans.

AP quotes Barrot today, however, as saying that "the debate still needs to be open" on the military aspects of Galileo. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
TRIANGULAR orbits will help Rosetta to get up close with Comet 67P
Probe will be just 10km from Space Duck in October
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
China to test recoverable moon orbiter
I'll have some rocks and a moon cheese pizza please, home delivery
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Vulture 2 spaceplane autopilot brain surgery a total success
LOHAN slips into some sexy bespoke mission parameters
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.