Feeds

Samsung, Toshiba join SanDisk in US antitrust probe

NAND flash market goes under the scope

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

The US Justice Department is busy handing out more RSVPs to NAND flash memory makers, cordially inviting them to a new market-wide price fixing investigation.

On Friday, SanDisk revealed the company and its CEO, Eli Harari, received a grand jury subpoena from federal district court in regard to possible antitrust violations. SanDisk has now been joined by the Japanese electronics firm Toshiba and South Korea's Samsung in the investigation.

The DoJ, for its part, would only say it has launched a probe into the flash memory market and revealed little details. The investigation will likely examine the steep rise in NAND prices that occurred this spring.

SanDisk's US partner Toshiba also said on Friday that it received a subpoena. Samsung, the world's largest maker of memory chips, followed suit today, announcing it has received a similar how-do-you-do from the DoJ.

"Samsung will cooperate fully with the ongoing Department of Justice Antitrust Division investigation," it said in a brief statement. The company added that it is committed to ethical behavior — saying it runs a formal training program that stresses the importance of following acceptable business practices.

Hynix, the world's third largest NAND maker, said today it has not yet been contacted by US authorities about the investigation.

Over the last three years, the Department of Justice has secured price-fixing convictions for DRAM manufacturers such as Samsung, Elpida, Hynix and Infineon. Together, they have coughed up over $730m in fines. In October 2006, US authorities opened an investigation into the SRAM market.

The Canadian Competition Bureau has also opened up an antitrust investigation into flash suppliers. The bureau has asked SanDisk to preserve any records relevant to such an investigation. ®

US Department of Justice widens NAND flash memory probe

The unhappiest show on earth?

Best practices for enterprise data

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
Microsoft says 'weird things' can happen during Windows Server 2003 migrations
Fix coming for bug that makes Kerberos croak when you run two domain controllers
Cisco says network virtualisation won't pay off everywhere
Another sign of strain in the Borg/VMware relationship?
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?