Feeds

Microsoft: no plan to appeal EC verdict for now

Smith starts reading judgement, thanks commission again

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Microsoft has yet to decide whether to appeal the verdict of the Court of First Instance, according to the company's general counsel Brad Smith.

Speaking in Brussels, Smith said: "We've not made that determination on whether to appeal. We've barely read the decision once. You would need to read this decision a few times before coming to any decision. I'm not addressing that today."

Smith likened the situation to a Woody Allen quote: "I took a speed-reading course and read War and Peace in 20 minutes. It involves Russia."

He once again thanked the court and the commission for its professional work. He said he was glad Microsoft won on the issue of the monitoring trustee, but said no one would claim it was the most important part of the case.

He said the process of creating documentation for interoperability information had been difficult, but: "I can stand here today and say we have a complete and accurate set of specifications. There are a couple of issues but I hope they can be solved quite quickly. One issue is pricing - the commission asked us to reduce our prices, which we have done."

He said there could be further movement on prices - this issue is contentious for open source companies which may not have the revenue stream to pay licensing.

Smith said: "The world, our industry, and our company have changed considerably since 1998. Our ties in Europe have never been as deep or as wide as they are now."

Smith said he had called the commission this morning to convey his congratulations, but would not detail who he spoke to.

He said if anyone has questions on interoperability information they should go to Microsoft: "We're open for business for licensing interoperability information."

Competition Commissioner Neelie Kroes also spoke today. She described the decision as "bitter sweet" because consumers and businesses were still suffering a lack of choice.

Mario Monti, the former Competition Commissioner who started the case, told Reuters that Microsoft's Steve Ballmer offered him a deal shortly before the March 2004 decision. Monti said the decision by the Court of First Instance would allow the European Commission to act more quickly in future.

More from Reuters here.

Microsoft's take on today's decision is available here and the court's decision (pdf), all 152 pages of it, is here.

Microsoft faces a €497m fine for the original offence plus €280.5m imposed in July 2006 for failing to comply with that decision. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.