Feeds

USAF flying deathbot power-grab rebuffed

Aerial killdroids escape military pilots' union

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

The US Air Force (USAF)'s plan to seize control of almost all American flying killbots has been rebuffed, according to reports.

At present, a wide variety of remote-controlled and/or autonomous aircraft are operated by all four branches of the US military*. The USAF has been pointing out for some time that this can lead to inefficiencies, as it might be possible to buy fewer types in larger numbers.

Strangely enough, the USAF's plan for a more efficient future involved an air force takeover of all drones/robots etc operating above an arbitrary ceiling of 3,500 feet. This could have given the men in light blue control of the navy's future carrier wings and maritime patrol planes, not to mention the many aerial flesh-harvesters so beloved of Army and Marine grunts and special ops types.

In effect, it would have been a massive skybot power grab, by a service which is institutionally far from sympathetic to aerial drones.

At first, the scheme seemed to be gaining some traction, but now it appears that Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England has put the kibosh on it in a memo issued last week. However, he does intend that competing Army and USAF programmes involving the "Predator" drone from General Atomics should be combined and include a common datalink.

The Army Predator (or "Sky Warrior") is planned to operate without significant use of remote handling by qualified pilots, being able to land itself autonomously. Thus far, USAF Predator operations have involved a large number of wings-on-chest types, usually working in shifts. Exactly how the differing philosophies will be resolved isn't clear.

Some more detail is available from Aviation Week

*Note to non-US readers: the US Marines normally count as a separate service. Probably fair enough, as they are about the size of two British services combined.

The next step in data security

More from The Register

next story
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM
Internet of Stuff securo-cockups strike yet again
'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator
We just might notice if you cut our cables
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
Hackers pop Brazil newspaper to root home routers
Step One: try default passwords. Step Two: Repeat Step One until success
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
Microsoft to patch ASP.NET mess even if you don't
We know what's good for you, because we made the mess says Redmond
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.