Feeds

Aussie politicos in a froth over naval boob jobs

Storm, B-cup ... you get the picture

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Australian politicians have criticised a decision by armed forces medical authorities to pay for two female sailors' breast enlargement operations.

The BBC reported yesterday that a plastic surgeon in Australia said he had carried out two such procedures for a total cost of around £8,500. Just to put this in perspective, that's about 0.01 per cent of what Australia will pay for a single one of its controversial new Super Hornet fighters.

A gratuitous pic of some big round artificially inflated armed-forces assets.

Spokesman Brigadier Andrew Nikolic said that the Oz forces "consider the broader needs of our people, both physical and psychological."

"But that is a long way from saying that if someone doesn't like their appearance, Defence will fund things like breast augmentation as a matter of routine – that is just not correct."

This presumably means that the breast enlargements had been recommended by a psychiatrist as necessary to the female sailors' mental health. It's possible for British citizens – whether in the armed forces or not – to get similar treatment on the NHS, on similar grounds.

In fact, it would probably be difficult to find a Western armed forces organisation which hadn't funded some sort of mildly, er, titillating operation or procedure for these reasons. It would be a bold employer who opted to disregard the recommendation of a consultant doctor as to what medical treatment was appropriate, even if the doc in question was a trick-cyclist and the treatment was a boob job.

Nonetheless, opposition Labor politicos still thought it was appropriate to demand full details.

"On the face of it, taxpayer-funded breast enhancement is a questionable practice," Labor defence spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon told the Beeb, though he didn't specify whether this was on aesthetic grounds or what.

Fitzgibbon felt that the move "smacks of a government out of touch".

We'll let you run with that one.®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Apple's Mr Havisham: Tim Cook says dead Steve Jobs' office has remained untouched
'I literally think about him every day' says biz baron's old friend
Flaming drone batteries ground commercial flight before takeoff
Passenger had Something To Declare, instead fiddled while plane burned
Cops apologise for leaving EXPLOSIVES in suitcase at airport
'Canine training exercise' SNAFU sees woman take home booming baggage
Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen
Angry Microsoftie hauls auctioneers to court over stalled Pzkw. IV 'deal'
Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy
Apple's chief designer forgot one crucial point about overpriced bling
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.