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While struggling to get its chip machismo back, AMD has decided to distract itself as much as possible by rolling out a new Twitter-based news service.

Yes, friends, it has come to this. The same company that set up a huge - now vacant - shop in Sadville wants to grab hold of hacks via the worthless craze known as micro-bogging. We're told that reporters need to sign up to AMD's Twitter trough here if they want to receive 24X7 pearls of wisdom from the marketing department. With all of 140 characters to work with, you can see where this leads.

"Dewd. Hector sez, 'Our competitor sucks.' See you in court, Chipzillinator!"

Or perhaps.

"Here's a friendly reminder. Native cores rule. (You will get 18 reminders today.)"

AMD appears determined to attract the worst of the worst from the hack kingdom. Last week, the chip maker gave time to pro-bogger Robert Scoble, who interviewed CEO Hector Ruiz.

Reflecting on the experience, Scoble noted, "I try to learn something from these interviews and heard a term I hadn’t heard before. Turns out that AMD is planning on putting a lot more on processors in the future than just transistors."

Wow.

(I've only run into Scoble a couple of times at press sessions, and he has an awesome knack for having no idea what's going on even after being brain pounded by marketing material for an hour. Perhaps it's time to turn off the Twitter account and read a news story?)

Anyway, the AMD Twitter feed should fit right into Scoble and other boggers' wheelhouse. Stay tuned for more information on AMD's wicked cool, #&@%## journey past transistors and toward chip fairies one Zen koan at a time. ®

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