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Open source prima donnas to crush IBM, BEA and MS in 2008

And David Beckham's issues with FLOSS

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Meat Cast If you have anything at all to do with open source software, you'll want to listen to Episode 2 of Open Season because there's a good chance we said something good or bad about you.

Yes, Mulesource's Dave Rosenberg, Alfresco's Matt Asay and I are back again, building on the tremendous success of our first show. In Episode 2, you'll hear Rosenberg and Asay deal with their insecurities after one listener - a CEO at another open source software maker - charged them with being the two biggest prima donnas in the FLOSS field. You'll also hear us tackle a host of other subjects detailed below in the show notes.

As proof that we listen to our, er, listeners, we've broken this show up into two sections. The first consists of our witty banter. The second consists of our attempts to provide useful information for anyone looking to do business in the open source software market. Those of you that want to skip the banter should head to minute 35 or so in the broadcast.

Sincere thanks go out to the thousands of you that tuned in to the first show. As always, you can send any feedback to me at software@theregister.com. We hope to have Ubuntu chief Mark Shuttleworth on the next episode. In the meantime, enjoy.

Open Season - Episode 2

You can subscribe to the show on iTunes here or grab the Arse feed here. Ogg Vorbis coming, I swear.

Target Practice

We hit the following:

Minute 35 - Open Source Business Help

  • Developers learn the hard way about open code
  • Sales people learn the open source way
  • Good documentation equals dollars
  • How Mulesource beats Tibco and BEA through solid software and value triggers
  • When big vendors attack and how to defend - Oracle and IBM go after Mulesource
  • Alfresco and MuleSource vow to kick big guys in the groin in 2008
  • Documentum questions Alfresco and open source - Alfresco doesn't care
  • Sharepoint - Microsoft's brilliance
  • Mulesource News coming - break your silos
  • Ashlee's book gets ready to ship
  • Mark Shuttleworth possibly to star on next show
  • Mulesource vs. Hyperic in Wii tennis tournament
  • Dave drinks Red Monk kool-aid and starts blogging again
  • For next show: Indemnity vs. Customers Concerns

See you soon. ®

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