Feeds

BEA to tempt developers with Essex server

WebLogic weight loss

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Next year will see BEA Systems' first implementation of a slimmed down application server. Codenamed 'Essex', WebLogic Server version 10.3 will launch by March 2008 - BEA said at BEAWorld this week - and marks the debut of an architecture that lets developers remove modules they don't want prior to installation.

BEA promises a lightweight installer of 150Mb for the core WebLogic Server 10.3 application server, compared to today's 600Mb, which expands to 1.1Gb.

Developers will be able to unclick a series of check-boxes for extras like the WebLogic Server management console, UDDI and Xquery support, JDBC drivers, web server plug ins, and Beehive and Struts libraries that are currently thrown in.

The reduction is designed to enable faster download and installation, and allow for WebLogic Server installation on smaller PCs and servers.

In two years' time BEA will make it possible to boot-up only selected modules at runtime, for improved start-up and performance. This could mean the slimmer application server finds its way onto new products that have limited memory, power or processing capabilities, such as automotive devices.

Long-term, the BEA vision is that users can grab and download updates to the modules they want, rather than installing a completely new edition of WebLogic Server.

Underlying all of this is BEA's microServices Architecture (mSA), unveiled amid much hoopla at BEAWorld last year - but pretty much kicked to the sidelines at this year's event in favor of the hipper Genesis.

BEA says it has isolated and modularized 230 WebLogic component elements under mSA, using industry standards.

One goal of BEA's fat loss program is to attract developers who'd otherwise download the lightweight JBoss open source application server. Developers have given JBoss a leg-up to broader deployment inside many organizations. And this is challenging BEA's application server business.

Other features of WebLogic Server 10.3 include implementations of SAML 2.0 for single sign on, Microsoft and IBM's WS-Security and WS-Policy, Ajax and Dojo for rich internet clients, and an HTTP pub/sub engine so clients can run information feeds on a desktop without the user needing to hit the refresh button. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.