Feeds

Sun Solaris upgrade snuggles with Linux

Turns desktops into thin clients

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Sun Microsystems upgraded the Solaris 10 operating system today, most notably enabling its OS to run Linux and its applications on x86 systems.

The company has also announced virtual desktop software that can transform desktops and laptops into thin client devices.

With the Solaris 10 8/07 update, Sun accommodates for the rival OS through a new package for Solaris Containers, a virtualization feature which enables multiple versions of Solaris to run on a single server. The update includes networking enhancements and an updated version of the open source PostgreSQL database, which sports a performance boost.

Formally dubbed "BrandZ in OpenSolaris", the newly incorporated Solaris Containers for Linux Applications lets users run Red Hat Enterprise, CentOS and Linux applications. Sun hopes the move will tempt the Linux crowd to migrate to their side of the field, and expects to support other LInux distributions in the future.

Solaris Containers can now also better manage its resources. Users will now be able to define how much memory and how many processors should be assigned to a particular application or container.

Each container will also receive its own IP stack, so users can track network traffic consumed by each container, rather than a broad server level. Sun said this will better enable an administrator to know if an application should be moved to a different server.

The update includes PostgreSQL 8.2 and better integration between the open source database and Solaris. The spec includes improved warm standby capabilities, online index builds and support for DTrace probes. The result is a 20 per cent improvement in online transaction processing, Sun says.

Virtual Desktop Software

In step with the VMworld show, which is running this week in San Francisco, Sun is previewing new virtual desktop software that can turn PCs into thin clients moving applications and the operating systems off desktops and mobiles into the data center.

Sun Virtual Desktop Infrastructure Software 1.0 (Sun VDI) is a platform for accessing virtualized Microsoft Windows desktop environments from a variety of devices. Coupled with VMware Infrastructure software, VDI consolidates desktops onto servers, giving each user a dedicated and isolated virtual machine.

According to Sun, each virtual desktop will function as though it runs directly on the user's computer, but with critical data residing in the data center. This guards against loss or theft — but Sun also reckons it's a way to reduce some of the running costs of the traditional desktop environment. For instance, the VDI software allows IT managers to set up new users and workgroups, and control and manage desktops and updates from a central location.

"The accelerated adoption of server virtualization has heightened awareness of the benefits of consolidating servers and IP in the datacenter, and has paved the way towards the adoption of a hosted and virtualized desktop model," said Marc Hamilton, veep of Solaris marketing at Sun.

The VDI software will be available in October, at a price of $149 per user, installable on Solaris and Linux. ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.