Feeds

South Korea chucks antitrust charges at Intel

Joins worldwide crusade

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

South Korean officials have issued antitrust charges against Intel, in a move that caps a two-year investigation and creates one more headache for lawyers at the world's biggest chip maker.

The Korean Federal Trade Commission (KFTC) issued a so-called statement of objection against Intel, company spokesman Chuck Mulloy said. He declined to specify the allegations contained in the document, but South Korean news reports have said the inquiry has focused on allegations Intel ran roughshod over antitrust laws by pressuring computer makers to avoid using chips made by Advanced Micro Devices.

"We're confident that the microprocessor market segment is functioning normally and that Intel's conduct has been lawful, pro-competitive and beneficial to consumers," Mulloy told us. "We will now have the opportunity to respond to the commission's objections. We hopefully will be able to show the commission that the market functions properly."

Intel was already facing charges of anticompetitive behavior filed in July by the European Commission. The Santa Clara-based company is also defending itself against a private antitrust lawsuit brought in June 2005 in US district court by AMD, as well as about 80 consumer-related class actions. There is also a separate complaint filed by AMD in Japan that largely echoes the charges it made in its US-based lawsuit.

Washington DC lobbying group the American Antitrust Institute has also called on the US Federal Trade Commission to investigate Intel for alleged anticompetitive practices.

Intel has denied acting anti-competitively and has said its actions benefit computer buyers.

Under the procedure established by the KFTC, Intel will undergo an administrative process in which it will be able to defend itself against the charges. Commission officials will then make a determination. If Intel objects to that determination, it has the right to appeal it to South Korea's judicial system. South Korean media cited unnamed sources who said the commission would likely reach a decision on a penalty by October.

Like many of the prior antitrust complaints against Intel, the KFTC is zeroing in on discounts Intel offered computer makers in exchange for making exclusive deals and coercion it is said to have applied to prevent them from doing business with AMD, the Korea Times reported.

Lest readers think the KFTC has no teeth, it's worth noting that the commission in late 2005 fined Microsoft $34m and ordered it to produce a version of Windows without bundling a media player and instant messaging software. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.