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Public rejoices at new 'green' nukes

Time for that nuke ferry across the Mersey

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The initial results of the government's consultation on the future of nuclear power are in, and broadly supportive of the government's position - to revive the moribund nuclear industry because it's now "green".

The consultation asked more than 1,000 people around the country to answer the following question:

"In the context of tackling climate change and ensuring energy security, do you agree or disagree that it would be in the public interest to give energy companies the option of investing in new nuclear power stations?"

Overall, the 45 per cent of the UK professed itself to either agree or strongly agree with this statement. Regionally, this ranged from 39 per cent in London to 62 per cent in Exeter. Dissenters managed to grab 37 per cent of the national vote, with 16 per cent neither agreeing nor disagreeing. A further two per cent were simply unable to make up their minds.

Secretary of State for Business and Enterprise, John Hutton, found himself in Liverpool this weekend, where 40 per cent of respondents either agreed or strongly agreed with the statement. The city also had the largest percentage who neither agreed nor disagreed, although what this tells us about having cabinet ministers at public events is unclear.

Hutton said:

"Today has been a tremendous success. Around 1,000 people have shared their views on how we can secure our energy supplies for the future. We have a preliminary view; that nuclear should be able to play a part in providing the energy that we need to keep the lights on and help cut carbon emissions. But it is important that we know what the public thinks."

(As long as it's what we want - ed).

Last week the green lobby threatened to walk out of the consultation, accusing the government of being selective in the material it was putting forward to the public at the consultations.

You can make your voice heard for another month by pointing your browser here and taking part in the consultation. ®

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