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Master crim leaves vital clue at scene of burglary

'Peter Addison was here!'

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An 18-year-old burglar spectacularly avoided elevation to the league of master criminals by writing "Peter Addison was here!" at the scene of a break-in, the Sun reports.

Addison and Mark Ridgeway, 18, both subsequently admitted burglary at Macclesfield magistrates' court after a short police investigation into the raid on the Toc H campsite for under-privileged children in Adlington, Cheshire. The pair "let off fire extinguishers and smashed crockery by using dinner plates as cricket balls, causing damage totalling £2,175", the court heard.

The incriminating message - written in black felt marker - was accompanied by one identifying Addison's membership of "The Adlington Massiv!" and another reading "Thanks for the Stay".

Camp volunteer Irene Power, 61, explained: "When I saw the message 'Peter Addison was here!' I just assumed it was a decoy to throw police off the scent. I couldn't believe it when I found the burglar was actually called Peter Addison. I'm very disappointed with the boys who carried out this crime — their actions were irresponsible and stupid. We had only just finished renovating the site and it took us hours to clear up the mess."

Insp Gareth Woods of Cheshire Police said: "There are some pretty stupid criminals around but to leave your own name at the scene of the crime takes the biscuit. The daftness of this lad certainly made our job a lot easier."

Addison, of Heaton Mersey, Stockport, was slapped with a one-year conditional discharge and ordered to pay £750 compensation and £20 costs. His partner in crime was sentenced to 60 hours’ community service and will also pay £750 compensation and £20 costs. ®

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