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Apple lobs $100 credit at iPhone buyers

El Reg demands an apology

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Much to our surprise, Apple mavens have revolted against Steve Jobs. And he's trying to appease them.

After receiving hundreds of emails from iPhone buyers upset that Apple lopped $200 from the price of its handheld status symbol just 68 days after its debut, Jobs has offered an olive branch. According to a letter posted earlier today, each person silly enough to have purchased an iPhone since the end of June will receive a $100 credit - for more Apple stuff.

"Even though we are making the right decision to lower the price of iPhone, and even though the technology road is bumpy, we need to do a better job taking care of our early iPhone customers as we aggressively go after new ones with a lower price," Jobs wrote. "Our early customers trusted us, and we must live up to that trust with our actions in moments like these."

Apparently, offering a cash refund was out-of-the-question. And with one million iPhone buyers walking the streets, we can understand. But couldn't he pony up a store credit for at least $200? That's how much the company pilfered from all those gullible souls over the past month and change.

"We have decided to offer every iPhone customer who purchased an iPhone from either Apple or AT&T, and who is not receiving a rebate or any other consideration, a $100 store credit towards the purchase of any product at an Apple Retail Store or the Apple Online Store," Jobs continued. "Details are still being worked out and will be posted on Apple's website next week. "

If you're an iPhone buyer, we want to know if you're appeased. And we want you to thank us for telling the truth about yesterday's slap in the face. Clearly, even Jobs agrees with us.

If you've bought an iPhone over the past 14 days, you're sure to be appeased. With receipt in hand, you can actually recover that lost $200. And you don't have to spend it on more Apple stuff. ®

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