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Garmin adds Google capability to 700 series

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IFA 07 Garmin, not to be outdone by rival satnav maker TomTom, has rolled out its latest series of high-end in-car navigation systems, the Nuvi 700 family.

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Garmin's Nuvi 760 (right) and 770

The latest line-up replaces the manufacturer’s existing 600 series and is divided up into four models: the 710, 750, 760 and top-end 770, with the only main differences being map content and price. All four have 4.3in touch-sensitive displays and integrated GPS antennae.

All incorporate compatibility with Google Earth, something that TomTom models don't yet offer, and which allows users to plot a previously travelled journey onto the Google software and view their route with a more interactive element.

Garmin Locate, another new software feature, also aims to provide a greater level of detail to users' travels, helping them find their nearest, say, cash machine, fast-food joint or hospital - though presumably not the pub.

Like TomTom's new, IFA-announced GO 920T, Garmin's 700 series allows users to wirelessly transmit directions and MP3 songs through to car radio. However, only the 710, 760 and 770 models allow for telephone calls to be transmitted, via Bluetooth.

The 710 comes with regional maps for the UK, Ireland and another region of choice - Western Europe or the US, say - while the 750 only has UK and European maps. The 760 comes with UK and European maps, while the 770 features an extended mapping service for the UK, Europe and the US.

The 700 series will be available across Europe from October, although Garmin doesn't plan to release the 750 in the UK for some reason. The 710 will retail for £280 (€310/$580), the 760 for £370 (€400/$740) and the 770 for £450 (€485/$900).

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