Feeds

Cells 'react' to GSM signals claims research

Cellphone-cancer link generates headlines in under 10 minutes

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

New research claims that cells can react to a GSM-like signal in as little as ten minutes - though if whether this could causes cancer remains open to interpretation.

Those who believe that mobile phones do cause cancer, and/or a wide variety of other ailments, suffer from two problems: the fact that long-term studies have shown no causal link, and the fact that there is no known mechanism for phones to affect cells. This study would seem to address the latter issue.

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot exposed cells to signals at 875MHz (close to one of GSM's frequencies), the signal was very low-level in order to avoid heating the cells, which is known to have effects. The researchers then report (in Biochemical Journal) that the cells exhibited changes in their "ERK Pathways".

This doesn't mean the cells are cancerous. Indeed Simon Arthur, at the University of Dundee, is unimpressed; as reported by New Scientist:

"Transient and reversible activation such as this is unlikely to [cause cancer] ... transient activation of ERK1/2 occurs frequently in response to a huge variety of signals and is an essential component of many aspects of cellular physiology".

So what we have established is that it is possible for cells react to radio waves, but that their reaction is a long way from cancer. There also remains the first problem, that of long-term empirical studies, before we can point the accusing finger at our mobiles and relight our fags.®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.