So, what's the velocity of a sheep in a vacuum?

Plus, the size of Wales in cubic furlongs

Theoretical versus practical limits of sheep in a vacuum

There are, of course, some tricky real-world problems that interfere with smooth calculations of the speed of a sheep in a vacuum. So far we have assumed that the sheep is a perfect sphere (roughly equivalent to 20 footballs, or 220gf). In a perfect vacuum, this isn't a problem, but when you factor in the notoriously sticky interstellar medium and large, the assumption simply will not do.

The interstellar medium and large is, according to research, roughly as dense as the grey matter of the average Hollywood celebutant.

Assuming one super-sticky particle per cubic metre (or one brain cell per three starlets - don't ask us to guess which of them is currently using it), the interstellar medium and large exerts a drag on the average sheep equivalent to half a slightly scary Welshman. Thus, we can calculate the maximum real world velocity of a sheep in space:

Ssxspace = Ssxmax x dragISML

where dragISML is 0.5.

So, the maximum velocity of a sheep in space is 2997.5 km/sec.

And the size of Wales in cubic furlongs?

This is a tricky one. The political debate behind it is long and uninteresting, so we will skip it and report only that it has been determined that the volume of Wales has been defined as including all topsoil, land and equipment, up to, but not beyond, one metre below the surface.

This means everything below ground (coal) is English, while the Welsh can retain their cherished national symbol, the leek.

Wales is 20,780 square km x 1 metre depth

= 20,780,000,000 cubic metres = 103,300,000 cubic furlongs.

For those with an unhealthy interest in such things, this is also equivalent to 405000000000000 US tablespoons or 196600000000 biblical letheks. ®

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