Feeds

Dell's iSCSI assault revealed

Virtual attack on SMB market

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Exclusive Dell will host a major storage product unveiling in September, and we've got our money on an iSCSI storage device the company has been hinting at for months as part of the show.

The Register has learned that Dell is set to unveil a new iSCSI system called MD3000i. The unit will reportedly run on the same physical platform as the MD3000, which is Dell's direct attached SAS device.

At launch, the MD3000i will only support 400GB SAS drives. By November, however, the product should have 750GB SATA drives available.

Overall, the product is billed as a competitor to kit from LeftHand Networks.

Back in June, Dell storage marketing chief Praveen Asthana sat us down and laid out the company's plans for an aggressive push at the SMB market with iSCSI and virtualization as the star of the show. Asthana, of course, didn't spill the beans on the device, but rather gingerly inferred the curvaceous legumes that await, making us yearn to know the beany goodness that lies beneth — ahem — maybe beans aren't the right analogy for this...

Anyway, Asthana told us he believes virtualization has legitimized iSCSI as more than "a poor man's SAN." On top of its price point, the technology can avoid some of the technical maneuvering required of a physical protocol such as Fibre Channel, making it ideal for the small business market. Asthana said the company was planning a larger product roll out with a hardware/software blend around iSCSI and virtualization, but he wasn't ready to give out specifics at the time.

Using the MD3000 specs should have the iSCSI-capable MD3000i device at holding up to fifteen 3.5-inch SAS hot-pluggable hard drives. You can grab the vanilla 3000's spec-sheet here (pdf warning).

What better time to reveal the device than a Michael Dell keynote discussing a major storage initiative the company says will simplify IT for its SMB customers? Dell's event is set for Sept. 10 in San Francisco.

We're sure the vendor will have some more gear prepped for the gig, and are willing to hear about it early. You know the drill. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.