Feeds

Travelocity accidentally books 1,458 trips between US and Cuba

'Technical glitches' keep communism alive

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

From January 1998 to April 2004, Travelocity booked nearly 1,500 trips between the US and Cuba, violating a trade embargo first laid down by the American government at the height of the Cold War.

The online travel site has agreed to pay a $182,750 fine to the US Treasury, but communism is still alive in the Western Hemisphere.

Last week, with a statement posted to its website, the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced that the Forth Worth, Texas company had agreed to settle "allegations" that it violated the 25 year-old Cuban Assets Control Regulations, making 1,458 Cuba-related travel arrangements without an official license. When contacted, a Travelocity spokesman acknowledged the violations, but blamed them on a technical malfunction - a technical malfunction that went unnoticed for six years.

"The trips to Cuba were unintentionally permitted to be booked by consumers online because of some technical failures several years ago and it's just now being finally settled with OFAC," she said. "Again, this is a very old matter - most of the trips were purchased between six and seven years ago. In no way did the company intend to allow bookings for trips to Cuba and the company has fully cooperated with OFAC and implemented corrective measures."

When pressed, the company refused to explain these technical failures. We have no way of knowing if the site was compromised by party members posing as capitalistic Travelocity employees.

We also contacted the OFAC, but it wasn't any help either. Spokesman Molly Millerwise bounced all questions back to Travelocity.

But she did say that those who have violated the Cuban trade embargo may face civil or criminal charges. And according the OFAC's original statement, Travelocity didn't voluntarily disclose its violation.

Is the Cold War back on? Draw your own conclusions. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Managing SSL certificates with ease
The lack of operational efficiencies and compliance pitfalls associated with poor SSL certificate management, and how the right SSL certificate management tool can help.