Feeds
55%

Oono Transmita Vii wireless music system

Wireless music - just don't go into a different room

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Business security measures using SSL

Review 'Wireless' is a wonderful word that creates beautiful images in the minds of the gadget-obsessed masses. We imagine headphones and MP3 players working together in cable-free harmony, or desktop peripherals resting comfortably with our PCs, without constantly being pulled out of place by connection cords.

Manufacturer Oono has stepped up to the plate and created the Vii – a two-piece unit that claims to remove the need for connection cables between a music source and the output device by wirelessly transmitting audio content over short distances, for example, from the iTunes library on a computer to a pair of stereo speakers.

Vii
Size and simplicity are its two strong points

The Vii is Oono's second attempt at a wireless music system - the product is a redesign of an earlier model called, simply, the Transmita. The new kit is still very simple, consisting of a transmitter and a receiver, both of which are identical in size, design and shape. You also get a host of connection cables.

Thankfully, labels have been stuck on the underside of each unit to indicate which is the receiver and which the transmitter. But, it's disappointing that no set-up instructions are included with the packaging, forcing us to visit Oono's website for the PDF manual before we could do anything.

By Oono's own admission, the original Transmita "crept into the market in 2006 without much fan-fare", and this is presumably what spurred the Vii's new design. It ditches the predecessor's 'mobile phone with its face-plate removed' feel in favour of a sleek, palm-sized white box with black bands around the edge.

The kit is plug'n'play, so we connected it up to our Dell Inspiron 9400 laptop by plugging one end of the supplied 3.5mm-jack audio cable into the transmitter and the other into the laptop's headphone jack. We then plugged the second supplied audio cable into the receiver and plugged the other end into the supplied 3.5mm-to-RCA converter. The two remaining ends could then be connected into our compact stereo's rear phono jacks.

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.