Man loses leg in bathtub romp

And dead men buy no ringtones

A Japanese motorcyclist lost a leg in a collision with a motorway central reservation, and rode 2km farther before noticing something was amiss. Curious, you wondered what alerted him to his state of leglessness, as well as making many awful puns:

Presumably he might have twigged something was afoot (or not - sorry) by his inability either to apply the back brake, or change gears...

Jock Busuttil


He was clearly legless when it happened.

Probably full of Kawa-saki.

That's what happens when you 'put the foot down'.

He obviously was in knee'd of help.

cor


This certainly falls into the Bootnotes category

Peter D'Hoye


Was he riding a 'chopper'?

cor


Sure it's not an urban leg-end?

Martin Benson


Some of these comments have really gone out on a limb to be funny...

mcnicholas

And so on. You lot really put the boot in.


In a case that may foresee mediums everywhere going electronic, Telekom Malaysia has billed a dead man $218 trillion. The missive, addressed to his upright-and-breathing son, demanded that he pay within 10 days and threatened court action. Clearly the cost of next-to-this plane communication is too high at the moment, but competition will doubtless bring prices down.

The cost of calling from beyond the grave is obviously a bit more than Verizon's standard roaming charges.

Phone companies are clearly no threat to mediums yet!

edge_e


"The $218 trillion total is roughly 17 times the GDP of the United States."

Or this would take approximately 20 minutes downloading on most UK networks' 3G rates.

Jason Hall


I can understand the '806,400,000,000,000' part but not '.01'.

Can't they just round it off to '.00' LOL

Jags


This is simply more proof that accountants are demon members of the legions of the undead. Evidently part of the process of becoming an undead accountant leads to total removal of all vestiges of imagination and sense of humour.

Chris Goodchild


This reminds me of a situation that arose after my Father's death. I started receiving collection notices from some firm on behalf of the (then and still) defunct and out-of-business Montgomery Ward's department store. After some initial consternation, I decided to let it go, and see if a company that didn't exist any more could meet with any success collecting money from a person that didn't either. I viewed it as an interesting experiment. After several increasingly threatening notices, the problem went away on its own.

Anon

I once got a collection notice for a value of £0.00. Still got it somewhere. They were nice enough to drop the matter, leaving me free to spend that £0 on - you guessed it - more booze. It's Friday; do journalists think of anything else on Fridays? ®

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