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Sony Ericsson slides out K770 mobile camera phone

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Sony Ericsson has unwrapped its K770 Cyber-shot phone which touts a 3.2-megapixel camera and promises picture quality that rivals a standalone digital camera. But despite the upmarket camera specs, Sony insists it's a phone first and foremost.

The handset has a 1.9in TFT screen, which uses Sony’s Cyber-shot camera menu system, and provides an auto-focus lens with 3x digital zoom. Once the protective lens cover has been opened, eight icons light up on the phone’s keypad to act as one-click shortcuts for the camera’s functions, such as picture size and photo light.

K770
The K770 is a phone/digital camera

Photo fix software is built into the handset which should help you tweak any photos taken in poor light or those missing that element of sharpness. The handset will ship with a 256MB Memory Stick Micro card, which Sony said stores around 200 photos. It also has a phone memory of up to 16MB.

It measures 10.5 x 4.7 x 1.4cm and weighs 95g, with a maximum talk time of up to 10 hours over GSM or 2 hours and 35 minutes over UMTS. Video calling is also supported, with a maximum call time of 1 and a half hours.

K770_rear
A sliding cover protects the lens and activates the K770's camera

The K770 also functions as a music player, although this seems to fall into third position behind its communication and camera abilities when reading through the press blurb. Nonetheless, it supports MP3 and AAC, in addition to Bluetooth 2.0 connectivity with A2DP wireless stereo. It also includes an FM radio with RDS, which the manufacturer said will help users to seek out the clearest radio reception while on the move - unless you’re on the tube.

The Sony Ericsson K770 will be available in truffle brown. It will launch across selected markets during the fourth quarter of 2007. Its retail price is still unknown, but is likely to be tariff dependant.

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