Feeds

Buffer the Overflow Slayer v. the ActiveX Files

Flashpix nix 'safe for scripts'

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Microsoft's DirectX Media software development kit may be doing a lot more than helping designers give a realistic flesh tone to Lara Croft's breasts. It could also be introducing critical vulnerabilities into a countless number of applications that are spawned by the SDK.

That's because the SDK, which streamlines much of the work of building graphic-intensive video games and applications, contains a third-party ActiveX control that's vulnerable to a buffer overflow. Labeled DirectTransform FlashPix and provided by the Live Picture Corporation, it leaves applications vulnerable to attacks that allow for the remote execution of code.

An attacker would still have to lure a victim running FlashPix to a visit booby-trapped website or open a maliciously crafted email. But hey, we're talking about virtual worlds and multi-player video games, where people consort with strangers all the time.

"This is worse than your average social engineering situation," says security researcher Rodney Thayer. "If you're in a gaming environment where you're trying to get the dwarf to talk to you in English, you may actually listen to people who give you advice."

Internet Explorer can also be used as an attack vector, because FlashPix is labeled as "safe for scripting".

The vulnerability was discovered by Krystian Kloskowski and is rated "highly critical" in this posting on Secunia. It's also discussed here on the US-Cert website. Proof-of-concept code can be found on MilW0rm here.

The flaw comes courtesy of a boundary error in Live Picture's DXSurface.LivePicture.FLashPix.1, which translates to the DXTLIPI.DLL file on Windows machines. It can be exploited to cause a buffer overflow by assigning excessive strings to the affected property.

Workarounds include setting the kill-bit for the FlashPix control(CLSID {201EA564-A6F6-11D1-811D-00C04FB6BD36}) or disabling all ActiveX controls in the Internet zone.

A Microsoft spokesman said the company's security team is investigating the report and is unaware of any attacks using the claimed vulnerability. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Reddit users discover iOS malware threat
'Unflod Baby Panda' looks to snatch Apple IDs
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.