Feeds

Oracle names 11g Database price

Power of four

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Oracle has finally unveiled pricing for its long-awaited next database running on Linux, and it's mixed news for users.

The Oracle Database 11g price will remain the same as its predecessor, 10g: expensive. Unless, of course, you want to use some of that new functionality Oracle has been promising, in which case Oracle Database 11g becomes even more expensive.

There's still no word, meanwhile, on when users can expect 11g for Windows or Unix. A company spokeswoman told The Register Tuesday "details of the Windows and Unix GA [general availability] will not be available until a later date."

The statement came as Oracle announced the price for Oracle Database 11g Enterprise, Standard and Standard One for Linux would remain unchanged, while it also introduced four add-ons that'll bump up the base price.

Enterprise Edition starts at $40,000 per CPU or $800 per named user. The company had already padded Enterprise Edition with extras, such as Real Application Clusters priced at $20,000 per CPU or $400 per named user.

Oracle's four 11g extras are: Oracle Real Application Testing, Advanced Compression, Total Recall and Active Data Guard.

Real Application Testing and Advanced Compression are priced separately at $10,000 per processor or $200 per named user, while Total Recall and Active Data Guard are each $5,000 per processor or $100 per named user.

Real Application Testing will let customers reduce the time and costs of database upgrades, Advanced Compression brings data compression two to three times greater than available in 10g and is combined with improved partitioning, Total Recall provides archiving, and Data Guard offloads backups and queries to a single physical standby database.

The updates are among 400 changes to the first major update to Oracle’s database in almost four years. Among other changes are support for new data types, improved support for XML and faster handling of Large Object Binaries (LOBs), along with improved performance - RAC grids have been juiced up by 70 per cent.®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.