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Orange lands Lampard TV coup

Reality-mobile

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Chelsea midfielder Frank Lampard got his own TV channel yesterday, admittedly only available to Orange customers watching on their mobile phones, but it's one up on a MySpace page.

The channel, dubbed "Fat Frank TV" by some, will feature interviews and fly-on-the-wall footage of Frank's professional and personal life. Fans will be able to tune in to "Frank cooking Brussels sprouts", as well as "Frank playing with his dogs", and the unforgettable "Frank wrapping his Christmas presents" - all no doubt offering great insight into his footballing prowess. (Is he wrapping his pressies really early, or really late? Ed

Orange is hoping Chelsea fans will enjoy the experience of Frank TV so much they'll sign up for more viewing on the move - perhaps some meerkats or motorbikes.

Whether reality-TV style clips can really drive punters to watch TV on their phones, or if football fans really care if their midfielder likes Brussels', remains to be seen.

The omens so far are not good. As indeed are the omens for Chelsea's upcoming season.®

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