Feeds

IBM: Dinosaurs were green

Swapping 3,900 servers with 30 mainframes to save the planet

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

IBM loves to put a new spin on the mainframe to keep the legacy platform looking fresh and the doomsayers at bay. And now-a-days nothing makes a technology look brand-new than a fresh coat of green.

In the first move since announcing the $1bn Project Big Green initiative in May, IBM plans to make good on its eco-friendly promise by replacing a fleet of small servers with a mere flotilla of refrigerator-sized mainframes.

More precisely, it will consolidate 3,900 Unix and x86 servers onto 30 Linux mainframes. The company says the move — which it calls one of the most significant transformations of its data centers in a generation — will save the company enough electricity to power a small town.

"The mainframe is the single most powerful instrument to drive better economics and energy conservation at the data center today," said James Stallings, IBM mainframe general manager. "By moving globally onto the mainframe platform, IBM is creating a technology platform that saves energy while positioning our IT assets for flexibility and growth."

The project will span six IBM data centers in the US, England, Japan and Australia. The consolidated units will run Linux on top of the mainframes' operating system, z/VM. IBM will also chuck its physical servers in favor of a virtual server environment.

In addition to cutting the sheer amounts of units to power, IBM said moving to mainframes will also reduce the cost of software acquisition. Software is often priced on a per-processor basis. Moving to mainframes that have significantly fewer processors than the current 3,900 servers will help minimize software licensing charges.

IBM also predicts the new infrastructure will free up the data center IT staff. The company claims its newly-liberated employees can cast aside the shackles of systems administration in favor the higher-value projects of "designing and building customer solutions".

The company plans to burn the servers on a heap of old tires next to a playground recycle the 3,900 abandoned servers through IBM Global Asset Recovery Services. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.