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Sony claims price-driven PS3 sales hike

Up 135 per cent, apparently

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Sony has claimed that PS3 sales in North America have jumped 135 per cent since it brought the price of the 60GB console down to $499 two weeks ago.

The increase comes from sales of the console through Sony's five biggest retail customers, though it doesn't appear to have said whether or not there was a proportionate fall in sales through the rest of its retail channel.

Nor did it quantify the size of the increase. After all, growing sales by 135 per cent when you were only selling ten units before means you've only gone up to 23.5 units.

Not that Sony's PS3 sales are that small, but you get the point. Still, market watcher NPD has said June's US PS3 sales were up 21 per cent on the previous month's total to around 99,220 units. A 135 per cent increase takes the total to more than 233,167.

However, rather than take Sony's word for it, we'll wait for NPD's July figures, which will show whether Sony's gains have come at the expense of Microsoft and Nintendo - or that these companies have seen similar end-of-term sales jumps.

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