Feeds

IronRuby opened to all comers

Microsoft gives to receive

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

Microsoft has released early code for its Ruby-on-.NET scripting language during a week of actively courting developers and community feedback.

Four months after announcing IronRuby, Microsoft has released source code for the .NET scripting language under the Microsoft Permissive License (MPL). Microsoft is also accepting source code contributions to the IronRuby libraries.

IronRuby and its libraries will be offered to the community's RubyForge site by the end of August, for download and further contributions.

Participation in IronRuby is only going so far, though - at least for now. Community contributions to the Dynamic Language Runtime (DLR), which let IronRuby (plus Microsoft's IronPython) run inside the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) without being compiled, are not being accepted.

John Lam, who built the RubyCLR for writing .NET applications using Ruby and was last year hired by Microsoft, blogged: "Since the DLR will ship as part of the CLR in future, we cannot accept contributions into the IronRuby complier, at least initially. However, once the DLR matures and reaches 1.0 status with fully supported public interfaces, we will fully open up all parts of the new IronRuby project for external contributions."

S. Somasegar, corporate vice president of Microsoft's developer division said: "We will... be accepting external contributions to IronRuby libraries initially and expanding that offering to the entire IronRuby compiler once the Dynamic Language Runtime reaches 1.0."

The IronRuby release comes in the week of the O'Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON), where Microsoft is making a heavy play to engage with the open source faithful. A range of Microsoft executives will deliver keynotes and hold sessions on open source, scripting and on Linux's interoperability with Windows.®

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?
Google's app permissions far too lax – security firm survey
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
OpenWRT gets native IPv6 slurping in major refresh
Also faster init and a new packages system
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.