Feeds

MPack developer on automated infection kit

'We are just a factory producing ammunition'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

People have already started offering the MPack software for sale for a lesser amount. Are you worried about that?

Well, anyone can of course try to do that, but will they be successful? The main thing about MPack is not the scripts, but when the support and the methods of exploit are combined together.

Were you behind the development of WebAttacker? Some security firms have postulated a connection.

I know the WebAttacker team. We are friends. I was talking to WebAttacker's manager recently and he told me that they are going to start the real WebAttacker 2 pack in the near future.

Referring to MPack as WebAttacker 2 is a mistake. They are two different projects.

Some security experts refer to you as a Russian cybergang. Are you?

Cybergang is a funny word used by AVers (antivirus companies) and government officials. We are just a group of people working together, but doing some illegal business.

This supposed link with real-life criminals - I think it's bulls**t. AVers want to make an image showing us like bad guys stealing something from a store, etc. But really, almost none of my friends have any contact with criminals about our work or anything else.

Can you tell me anything about yourself?

I prefer to keep it in secret in order to make any official's job identifying me much harder. [However,] I have a legitimate job and am able to combine it with other projects, like MPack.

Are you worried about getting caught?

Yes, a bit. And with all these stories about MPack on the Internet, we will have to shut down the project fairly soon. The AV attention is bad because the more people know about the pack, the more the officials want to catch us.

In Russia, there is a law which forbids [malicious-software] creation tools like MPack, [but] we secure our systems to the best possible extent, so that even a police officer would not be able to get the PCs analyzed.

Do you feel sorry for the people whose machines are infected by an attack?

Well, I feel that we are just a factory producing ammunition.

Anything else you'd like to add?

I would advise you to use the Opera browser with scripts and plug-ins disabled in order not to be caught by the MPack someday.

This article originally appeared in Security Focus.

Copyright © 2007, SecurityFocus

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.