Feeds

Broadcom signs licensing pact with Verizon

Income and revenue down, something about an ex-CEO and whores...

High performance access to file storage

Broadcom announced their Q2 profit took a 68 per cent plunge today, but scored a victory in a long-in-the-tooth patent dispute with Qualcomm.

Verizon deal breaks blockade

The telecom chip-maker has inked a licensing deal with Verizon Wireless, which will allow previously banned 3G phones back into the US market.

Last month, the US Internal Trade Commissions banned the import or sale of 3G phones using Qualcomm chips that were found to infringe on a Broadcom patent.

Under the agreement, Verizon will give Broadcom $6 for each phone, PDA or data card that uses the disputed chips, or up to $40m per calendar quarter and up to a maximum of $200m.

Verizon had previously supported Qualcomm in its attempts to overturn the ban, claiming it would keep new phone models out of US consumer hands. Whether the company lost its fighting spirit or has concluded the ban is unlikely to be lifted, Verizon appears to have made a striking about-face. As a part of the deal, Verizon has agreed to stop pushing for a reversal.

Qualcomm continues to fight the import ban, but has no one to turn but President Bush himself, who has until August 6 to reverse the decision.

Verizon and Broadcom have also entered into a new alliance where they will both develop and launch internet networking, phone and GPS-related hardware that exclusively uses Broadcom IP to prevent any future patent squabbles. Details and conditions of the agreement were not revealed.

And now for finances

Broadcom's income for the quarter took a dive to $34.3m from $106.1m in the same period last year. The company blames weak business for cable modem and wireless chips, but forecasts an upcoming recovery.

Revenue fell 4.6 per cent to $897.9m, short of analyst expectations of $900.57m on average.

The company forecasts third quarter revenue will be in the range of $915m to $940m.

Secret sex lairs

Even profit slumps must be a welcome relief to a company that has been in the news for having an ex-CEO accused of threatening disobedient workers with death, wild orgies, cocaine abuse and using whores to seal deals with customers. Not that we want to perpetuate a story like that, but you can read about it for scientific purposes right here. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.