Feeds

Lightweight Java security app aims to pep up m-commerce

Good things come in small applets

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

UK mobile application developer Masabi has launched a lightweight Java security package for mobile phones in a bid to make m-commerce applications more user-friendly and secure.

Masabi's EncryptME Java mobile security component is the only such application to use officially validated implementations of RSA and AES encryption, according to BT, which tested the technology. The application provides RSA with PKCS Padding for keys up to 4,096 bits, AES with keys up to 256 bits, and an approved secure random number generator. Ed Howson, co-Founder of Masabi, told El Reg the technology provided web commerce-level security on the vast majority of existing handsets.

The technology, which has been validated by BT, occupies a footprint of only 3K, meaning it can run on any mobile phone that can run Java. Its small footprint leaves room for developers to squeeze in rich graphics and a friendly interface to new or existing mobile payment or messaging applications.

Using a single SMS message, or a few bytes of GPRS data, EncryptME can set up a secure session and sign up a new user, a new credit card, and make a transaction. The software is available in multiple currencies and languages and targeted towards applications including mobile banking and transport.

Masabi plans to run a pilot of the technology later this summer with train ticketing technology specialist YourRail, enabling transport tickets to be securely bought using mobile phone handsets. YourRail already provides a mobile ticketing system for Chiltern Railways that allows ticket purchases to be made on a PC.

By extending their system with EncryptME, new customers can sign up and purchase a ticket straight away from their mobile without the need for pre-registration or use of a PC. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.