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Man cuffed over Jamie Oliver email threat

Investigation into Cornwall National Liberation Army continues

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Devon and Cornwall police today confirmed they'd arrested a man in connenction with the Cornwall National Liberation Army (CNLA) threats against celebrity chefs Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein and their Cornwall-based restaurant ventures, news agencies report.

The unnamed 36-year-old from Padstow was arrested on 4 July and later released on police bail to appear on 14 August at Newquay police station. A police spokesman said that officers were conducting parallel inquiries into the threats.

The CNLA issued its email warning against Oliver and Stein last month. The missive, signed by the CNLA Directing Council, promised to purge Cornwall of the "imperialist" English flag, and listed its "operational objectives", beginning with: "Padstow (Padstein) and Rick Stein Operated Businesses".

It continued:"It is common knowledge that Rick Stein and his businesses are held in contempt by many Cornish nationals who live in the Padstow area and we are currently seeing Stein ride over local democracy."

Regarding Stein's claim that local businesses had "benefited from the 'rosy glow' of publicity his ventures have attracted", the email added: "One of our activists was a member of the Free Wales Army who were responsible for the burning of English holiday homes in that Country creating for the Imperialists another 'rosy glow' from the heat of the fires.

"At a unspecified date, Rick Stein will himself feel a 'rosy glow' in our Cornish port of Padstow. His vehicles and those of his clients and customers are also bona fide targets for our activists."

The CNLA described Oliver thus: "Another incomer who has caused the inflation of house and other living costs at Cornish expense and subsidised by European funding who, together with his clients and customers and the owners of the hotel, are also targets of the CNLA."

Around ten days after the written threat, the CNLA claimed responsibility for torching a disused Redruth brewery, describing the location as "a training camp for setting off incendiary devices". ®

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