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Commvault storage suite gets souped

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Commvault Systems is rolling out a major product overhaul and re-branding of its storage software. The product revamp includes improved performance, new security tools, de-duplication technology, and new search capabilities and indexing for better access to data.

For the upgrade, the company's unified data management suite QiNetix, has been re-branded to the more tongue-friendly, Simpana. CommVault marketing veep Dave West calls the upgrade "the second biggest launch the company has had to date," only taking a backseat to the release of the Galaxy data backup and recovery software.

The Simpana 7.0 suite now creates a virtual information pool of data stored across separate backup, archive and online systems. By incorporating the Fast Search & Transfer (FAST) InStream platform, corporate users can now search and retrieve files stored on- and off-site using Simpana's web-based interface. West said that making stored data easily available to Joe-corporate will allow critical information to be available to decision makers without hassling the IT crew and will speed discovery for litigation and compliance requests.

Simpana's new contextual indexing supports 370 content types and 77 different languages. Indexed items can include email messages, attachments, postings, files and documents from Microsoft Exchange Server and Sharepoint, IBM Lotus Domino software and NAS files shared across Windows, Linux and UNIX file systems.

Commvault is also jumping on the de-duplication wagon by introducing a single-instance storage capability into the software suite. Single-instancing removes duplicate copies of files and attachments during backups or while its sitting on the disk. The technology has become a hot commodity, and is rapidly becoming a cornerstone for the storage market.

The suite now features more robust security and encryption capabilities. New security and role-based authentication integrates Microsoft Active Directory, single-sign-on authentication and data encryption through ciphers such as the AES-256 standard.

Simpana adds a flotilla of storage platform and feature support — which would threaten to break our bullet points — so we'll point you here for the full list.

The suite is generally available now. A single server configuration starts at approximately $12,000 and up, depending on the complexity and configuration of the storage getup. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

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