Feeds

Intel schemes to confound online gaming cheats

FOGS of war

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

An Intel research project looks set to make good the maxim that a cheater never wins. It's developing specialist software and hardware to ensure that online gamers all play fairly.

Gamers have cheated since the dawn of gaming, developing codes to give them better weaponry, infinite lives, invicibility and, in the case of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, a jet-pack, unlimited ammunition and a pogo stick.

Many gamers - or should we say many cheats - will already be familiar with nProtect GameGuard, an anti-cheating software bundled with some online games. It works by blocking certain applications and cheating methods, such as macro programs. But some gamers have alleged the software frequently disrupts game play. PunkBuster is another anti-cheat system.

PunkBuster in action
PunkBuster in Doom 3

Intel's prototype Fair Online Gaming System (FOGS) - outlined in a MIT Technology Review story - is designed to beat the cheats without busting the gameplay. If implemented, it would be built into players' computers through a combination of chipset hardware and software. FOGS monitors gamers' activity at the hardware level for attempts to cheat.

For example, gamers who use input-based cheats could be detected by comparing the information they feed to the game with the data stream created by the game itself. Any discrepancies could then be identified as potential cheats without slowing play, the chip giant claims.

Intel also told TR FOGS can detect network-level cheats designed to extract hidden information from a game data sent over the network, such as other players' positions, and present it to the cheat.

Intel doesn't, as yet, have any plans to release FOGS into the public network, but if it helps me defeat LensMan91 who always seems to beat me at WarCraft, no matter how hard I try, then it'll win my support.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Mighty Blighty broadbanders beg: Let us lay cable in BT's, er, ducts
Complain to Ofcom that telco has 'effective monopoly'
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights
Virgin Media: UK fans pay the most for the fewest matches
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.