Feeds

US porn spammers guilty as charged

Canned by CAN-SPAM

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

Two men who ran a spam operation to promote pornographic websites had the book thrown at them today. A federal jury in Phoenix, Arizona convicted Jeffrey Kilbride, 41, of Venice, California and James Schaffer, 41 of Paradise Valley, Arizona of eight counts, including conspiracy, fraud, money laundering, and transportation of obscene materials.

In 2003, Kilbride and Schaffer set up a spamming operation to promote pornography sites. They earned $2m in commission from porn site operators for the traffic generated from the emails. Hard-core porn was embedded in each email, which meant that anyone who opened the email could see it.

Kilbride and Schaffer did not let the CAN-SPAM Act, which banned the distribution of multiple electronic commercial mail messages containing falsified header information, stand in their way.

When the law came into effect on Jan 1, 2004, they simply logged onto servers in Amsterdam, to make it seem like their email came from outside the US. Also, the 'from' names and email addresses were different from the 'reply to' addresses, so recipients could not identify the sender or reply to email.

In another violation of CAN-SPAM, the domain names used to send the spam were registered in the name of a "fictitious employee at a shell corporation Kilbride and Schaffer established in the Republic of Mauritius," the US Department of Justice said today.

To cap it all, the dastardly duo funneled their ill-gotten gains through the Republic of Mauritius and the Isle of Man to "further insulate themselves from detection by U.S. law enforcement".

In August, 2005 Kilbride and Schaffer were the first people charged under the CAN-SPAM Act. They face up to five years in jail for each spam and obscenity offense and a fine of up to $500,000 and up to 20 years for money laundering. They will be sentenced in September. Boy are they in trouble.

Three associates of Kilbride and Schaffer, who include housewife Jennifer Clason, 34, of Raymond, New Hampshire, have already pleaded guilty to breaching CAN-SPAM. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.