Feeds

US porn spammers guilty as charged

Canned by CAN-SPAM

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Two men who ran a spam operation to promote pornographic websites had the book thrown at them today. A federal jury in Phoenix, Arizona convicted Jeffrey Kilbride, 41, of Venice, California and James Schaffer, 41 of Paradise Valley, Arizona of eight counts, including conspiracy, fraud, money laundering, and transportation of obscene materials.

In 2003, Kilbride and Schaffer set up a spamming operation to promote pornography sites. They earned $2m in commission from porn site operators for the traffic generated from the emails. Hard-core porn was embedded in each email, which meant that anyone who opened the email could see it.

Kilbride and Schaffer did not let the CAN-SPAM Act, which banned the distribution of multiple electronic commercial mail messages containing falsified header information, stand in their way.

When the law came into effect on Jan 1, 2004, they simply logged onto servers in Amsterdam, to make it seem like their email came from outside the US. Also, the 'from' names and email addresses were different from the 'reply to' addresses, so recipients could not identify the sender or reply to email.

In another violation of CAN-SPAM, the domain names used to send the spam were registered in the name of a "fictitious employee at a shell corporation Kilbride and Schaffer established in the Republic of Mauritius," the US Department of Justice said today.

To cap it all, the dastardly duo funneled their ill-gotten gains through the Republic of Mauritius and the Isle of Man to "further insulate themselves from detection by U.S. law enforcement".

In August, 2005 Kilbride and Schaffer were the first people charged under the CAN-SPAM Act. They face up to five years in jail for each spam and obscenity offense and a fine of up to $500,000 and up to 20 years for money laundering. They will be sentenced in September. Boy are they in trouble.

Three associates of Kilbride and Schaffer, who include housewife Jennifer Clason, 34, of Raymond, New Hampshire, have already pleaded guilty to breaching CAN-SPAM. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described
'A degree of technical competence rarely seen'
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.