Feeds
86%

Acer TravelMate ProFile 6292 business laptop

Acer's... um... ace up its sleeve?

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Review The Acer TravelMate 6292 is the first of the company's new ProFile range, which promises to be "concrete, protective and productive", apparently. Designed for a hardy life on the road it features a magnesium alloy cover that's supposedly 20 times stronger yet considerably lighter than plastic. Would you like to know more?

Acer TravelMate 6292

While it would be hard to compete with the bullet-stopping capabilities of the ThinkPad, the 6292 certainly feels solid enough. However, although the casing appears sufficiently sturdy, there's nothing to latch the screen in place when it's folded, so it could still be susceptible to damage while travelling in your bag, if you're not careful.

Acer is touting the 6292 as an ultra-portable. While it's small, measuring just 30.5 x 22.5 x 3.5cm and weighing 2kg, it's still a bit on the large side to truly merit that description. It's no Sony Vaio TX, for example. It's certainly small enough to lug to the office and back everyday, but you probably won't want to take it with you everywhere you go.

The screen only stretches to 12.1in, which seems a little bit of a waste given the available space inside the lid. The large bezel running around the edge reminds you that you could have had a bigger screen if Acer had managed to squeeze one in. Resolution support is adequate, with a widescreen resolution of 1280 x 800, aka WXGA.

Given the relatively small screen size, you probably wouldn't want a higher resolution unless you've got extremely good eyesight. The display isn't overly reflective, but as a result it's not as vivid as the screens such as Sony's X-Black range, for example.

Acer TravelMate 6292

The 6292 sports Intel's latest 'Santa Rosa' Centrino Dup spec, which means you get a Core 2 Duo T7300 running at 2GHz, Intel GMA X3100 integrated graphics and 802.11n Wi-Fi. There's a healthy 2GB of DDR 2 memory thrown in and there's oodles of storage space on the 160GB hard drive. Acer has also included an internal 8x multi-format DVD writer, so you don't need to mess around with external units - another sign the 6292 isn't as ultra-portable as Acer might like us to think.

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
Apple analyst: fruity firm set to shift 75 million iPhones
We'll have some of whatever he's having please
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?