Feeds

IBM launches MySpace for mainframes

Discuss your addiction to Big Iron here...

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

IBM aims to leverage social networking by building an online meeting place for users of its System z mainframes. It says the Web-based portal, called Destination z, gives customers a place to discuss and debate mainframe usage, exchange ideas and seek technical advice.

The company also announced software to improve System z's security, compliance and consolidation capabilities.

A cynic might wonder if Destination z is mostly an attempt to off-load the business of support onto other customers. However, it is often true that - if the social side is done right - the best help comes from fellow users who've been through the same problems.

The developments are part of IBM's five-year plan to invest $100m in making mainframes easier to use. Big Blue hopes that this will persuade small and medium-sized companies that System z is a better choice than distributed systems. It said that several customers are already on board to Destination z, including Scottish Power.

As well as providing a meeting place for customers, system integrators and software developers to share ideas and seek advice, Destination z will link to IBM sales and technical resources such as case histories and mainframe migration tools. It will also provide space for IBM business partners to "drive business development and provide a broad spectrum of technical resources," the company said.

The new System z software includes security and compliance technology from IBM's acquisition of Consul last year, and a tool called IT Value-Based Analytics, which IBM claimed could help relate IT resource usage back to departments and compare an application's on x86 servers with its performance on the mainframe.

IBM has also enhanced the mainframe's z/VM virtualisation software to support ten times more virtual memory and up to 256GB of physical memory. This will enable a single mainframe to run more virtual servers, and in particular, more memory-intensive workloads such as database applications, the company said. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.