Feeds

Bush kills stem cell research bill

Debate will now be political

Security for virtualized datacentres

President Bush has used his veto to kill another bill that would have lifted some of the restrictions on research using human embryonic stem cells.

The news has been greeted with dismay, but not surprise, by the scientific community.

In announcing his use of the veto, Bush told reporters: "Destroying human life in the hopes of saving human life is not ethical."

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) said the bill had the support of "a broad coalition of Americans spanning all parties and faiths", and expressed its disappointment in the decision.

The New York Times reports that polls suggest the majority of voters, and even members of his own party would support a restriction on the regulations governing stem cell research.

"The scientific consensus is that embryonic stem cell research is an extremely promising approach to developing more effective treatments for devastating conditions like diabetes, spinal cord injuries, and Parkinson's disease.

"The bill would mandate that such research be allowed to compete for federal funding while following strict ethical guidelines," the AAAS said in a statement.

Political observers in Washington noted that the announcement has effectively made stem cells an issue in the 2008 presidential race.

Supporters of the bill are now considering attaching it to other legislation that Bush would be unlikely to reject. But it is more likely that it will be an issue for the next White House resident.

Both Hillary Clinton and Barak Obama declared support for the research, but the front running republicans are divided on the issue. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet
Probe prepares to make first landing on fast-moving rock
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.