Feeds

Newspapers not killed by net - shock!

But web freeloaders fill their boots

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A survey into the newspaper reading habits of the British has some rare good news for newspapers - and a warning for their net strategies.

The good news for media groups is that online readers show a strong loyalty to their favourite paper, with two thirds of Mail readers also buying a print copy, for example.

However, the Lemming-like rush to make all the print content available online has resulted in a class of freeloaders who never buy the printed version of the newspaper. The Guardian, which prides itself on the completeness of its online coverage - it doesn't hold anything back - has attracted the most freeloaders: 20 per cent of Guardian Online readers don't buy the paper (they don't buy anyone else's paper, either).

That's hardly surprising. When everything is online, they don't have to, and readers can save themselves over £5 a week.

"Perhaps the broadsheets are victims of their own online success, with their web readers getting all the news and comment they need online," notes David Day, CEO of Lightspeed Europe.

This leaves newspaper companies in a pickle. If they make their online version complete and attractive, they're discouraging readers from buying the much more lucrative print product. If they ignore the internet, they risk falling behind with the small but rapidly growing internet advertising business. Few have the loyalty that the Wall Street Journal commands, which has charged for almost everything from day one. So the prudent course would be to do as the New York Times has done - and hold some material back for subscribers.

The report also suggests that tabloid print papers don't translate well to online formats - or else the audience isn't interested.

Guardian readers and Times readers top the freeloader list, with the other "quality" papers not far behind. Fourteen per cent of Mirror and The Sun readers, and only 11 per cent of Daily Express readers, don't buy a print newspaper.

Lightspeed Research contacted 55,000 people in the UK in May. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Bladerunner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it
Go ahead, you're all clear, kid... Sorry, wrong film
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix
Everyone else in Europe compensates us - why can't you?
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!
Now my lawyers have bailed 'cos I'm 'OFFICIALLY' BROKE
Forget Hillary, HP's ex CARLY FIORINA 'wants to be next US Prez'
Former CEO has political ambitions again, according to Washington DC sources
prev story

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.