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OGCbs launches IT legal service contract

Aims for savings and greater accessibility

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OGCbuying.solutions has set up a legal services framework for IT business.

It announced the new arrangement as part of a wider framework of legal services. It projected that the categories would be worth £240m over their four year lifetime.

The categories were developed by OGCbs and the Treasury Solicitors Department and are designed to offer ready access – including common terms and conditions - to a range of firms from niche practices to full service commercial firms.

This new framework agreement is a development of the previous arrangements under L-CAT and incorporates full commercial and major projects categories to cover complex and high value projects.

Derek Rothwell, procurement director of OGCbs, commented: "L-CAT saved customers over £5m in 2006-07. Going forward with the new set of legal services frameworks, I'm confident that we will secure even greater savings combined with better accessibility.

"Although savings are important, the quality of the service is paramount and this framework offers a comprehensive range of legal firms offering a broad range of expertise and support".

Treasury solicitor Paul Jenkins said: "The legal services framework agreement will be available to the public sector as a whole and will play an essential part in streamlining the government's procurements and ensuring more effective competition. It can only do that if users are committed to using the framework effectively and seek real value for money.

"I anticipate a rapid move away from any pre-existing departmental and ad hoc arrangements to a consistent and widespread use of the new framework as the default approach to selecting and appointing external legal service providers."

The companies in the category for IT, telecommunications, and ecommerce are: Property & Estates; Davitt Jones Bould; Cripps Harries Hall; Blake Lapthorn Tarlo Lyons; Shoosmiths; Bond Pearce; Hammonds; and Berwin Leighton Paisner.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

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