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Citrix eats dead NAC vendor assets

Tastes like chicken, SSL and IPSec VPN functionality

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Citrix will scavenge the carcass of belly-up vendor Caymas Systems, purchasing assets of the NAC (network access control) start-up for an undisclosed sum.

San Jose-based Caymas has been shopping around for a company to pick its bones since closing its Petaluma offices in March.

Caymas's IP is a mixture of remote and local network access control in a single appliance. A similar hybrid approach has been taken by Cisco and Nortel.

Citrix will absorb a small number of Caymas staff into their Application Networking Group. The company said it will not, however, develop or support Caymas devices.

The still-warm corpse of Caymas is one of the first causalities of the new NAC market. The company, founded in 2002, was a rising star in the sector, garnering $37m in venture capital funding. ®

Bootnote

The wonderful people at Caymus Vineyards won't be saddened by Citrix's acquisition. They've suffered from some naming issues with Caymas around, prompting the appliance maker to put an awkward disclosure at the bottom of its web pages.

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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